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Audio | April 21, 2017
Elise Moser first heard the name Milly Zantow at a conference and was surprised to learn that the driving force behind plastic recycling was from her new town – Sauk City. Moser thought she didn’t know about her because she was new to Wisconsin but asking around, she learned that lots of people didn’t know Milly’s story.
Audio | April 19, 2017
Space travel entranced Dean Robbins as a kid. He idolized astronauts and closely followed the Gemini and Apollo missions. But despite his devotion, there was one thing he didn’t know about one of his space heroes.
Audio | April 12, 2017
The calendar might say spring but our climate begs to differ. Katie Venit has learned to appreciate even the little hints of spring.
Audio | March 15, 2017
When the snow is mostly gone and the days start to feel longer, there’s one part of winter that tends to stubbornly hang on. Mike Paulus tells us about his – and our – battle with our icy foe.
Audio | March 8, 2017
The lake in Lake Hallie is narrow and shallow but not without its excitement… especially when the ice freezes. Patti See tells the news from Lake Hallie. 
Audio | February 24, 2017
The Le Maire sundial compass was the mid-18th century equivalent to today’s GPS. It was found near Green Bay in 1902 and recalls a time when Wisconsin was part of New France. The Neville Public Museum's Kevin Cullen has the story.
Audio | February 10, 2017
With long cold winters, many of us develop a deep and sometimes fraught relationship with our winter gear. Christi Clancy tells us about her struggle and search for new coat.
Audio | February 3, 2017
There are many things to enjoy about a frozen lake. For Patti See, it’s a bonfire built, improbably, on the frozen lake.
Seed Library
Video | January 24, 2017
Gardener and librarian Cindy Mischnick helped start La Crosse's Seed Library where patrons can "check out" seeds, plant them and return the new seeds to the library to keep the collection growing.     
Audio | January 23, 2017
Wisconsin winters are known for being cold and harsh. But John Gurda reminds us of the 19th century settlers who toughed it out on the edge of the world.

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