Culture & History

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Audio | September 21, 2016
Mildred Fish Harnack was the only American woman executed by Hitler during World War II. Writer Meg Jones tell us about the Milwaukee-born literature teacher turned spy.
Audio | September 16, 2016
Few people win one Pulitzer Prize. Madison-born Thornton Wilder won three, including one for the seminal play, “Our Town.” Wilder’s nephew Tappan Wilder tells us about his uncle.
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Video | September 14, 2016
Meet a determined University of Wisconsin-Whitewater athlete, a collector who restores classic arcade games, a wooden mask carver, a honey bee breeder who has found sweet success on her farm, and a Two Rivers resident who’s crafted a song about the fading manufacturing era.
Audio | September 14, 2016
Historians don’t tend to make waves but Frederick Jackson Turner’s pronouncement that the frontier was closed launched a debate about the American character that still resonates to this day.
Audio | September 9, 2016
Best known now for the movies made from her books, Edna Ferber was one of the best-selling and most prolific writers of her era. She grew up in Wisconsin and got her start as a reporter in Appleton and then Milwaukee.
Audio | September 7, 2016
A prolific writers of novels, short stories, and essays, Wisconsin-born writer Hamlin Garland broke with the romanticism of his time to describe the harsh realities of farm life in his books. Keith Newlin introduces us to the man who called himself a “son of the middle border.”
Audio | September 2, 2016
The Pulitzer Prizes turn 100 this year. We’re honoring the occasion with a look at five winners with Wisconsin ties.
Audio | August 31, 2016
Education gave Jeff Snowbarger’s farmboy grandfather the world. It also taught him how to navigate through despair.
Audio | August 26, 2016
Few jobs were as miserable and hot as work in a 19th century iron mill – especially in the summer. We may be sweating now but historian John Gurda tells about the workers who labored in unimaginable conditions.
Audio | August 24, 2016
When he was 6 years old, David Rozelle’s mother left him and his sister at an orphan home in Racine. What was supposed to be a temporary situation turned into six years. But this isn’t the story of despair that you might expect – Rozelle recalls those years at the Taylor Home as some of the best of his childhood.

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